Misbranded Blog

Visit the Full Blog

Misbranded is Patterson Belknap’s blog covering false advertising litigation—both consumer class actions and competitor suits—with a particular focus on FDA-regulated products (foods/beverages, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and dietary supplements).  Writing from the industry perspective, we provide timely updates on important cases, surveys of litigation trends, and in-depth analyses of “hot” legal issues.  Our firm pioneered the modern practice of false advertising law more than 40 years ago, bringing the first competitor suits under the Lanham Act.  In the decades since, we have continued to practice at the cutting edge, handling many of the field’s most groundbreaking cases on behalf of the nation’s best-known businesses.  Today, led by Steven A. Zalesin, our team advocates creatively, strategically, and efficiently on behalf of our clients at all phases of litigation, from pre-complaint demands to Supreme Court appeals.

Speak of the Devil… Class Certified in “Slack-Fill” Case for the First Time

Speak of the Devil and he doth appear. Today, it’s just a figure of speech.  In medieval England, by contrast, people meant it literally—as a warning that uttering the Prince of Darkness’s name would conjure his evil presence.  Maybe those Anglo-Saxons had a point.  A few weeks ago, we wrote a post about a remarkable string of defense victories in “slack-fill” cases—i.e., lawsuits complaining of too much empty space in product packaging.  In particular, we noted that “every slack-fill case to reach the class-certification stage ha[d] flunked Rule 23’s rigorous test for certification,” and we wondered aloud “how a slack-fill class could ever be certified.”  Well, speak of the Devil: just four days later, a California court certified a class in a slack-fill case for the first time ever.  We apologize for any causal role we may have had in this truly diabolical development.  The good news is that the decision may not stick—and even if it does, it’s likely to remain an outlier.

Go

Compelled Product Disclosures After NIFLA – First Impressions

This is an exciting time for manufacturers on guard against compelled disclosures in their product labeling or advertising.  Late last June, the Supreme Court decided  National Institute of Family & Life Advocates v. Becerra, 138 S. Ct. 2361 (2018) (“NIFLA”), an abortion case with potentially far-reaching effects on the law of compelled commercial speech more generally.  However, as lower courts begin to interpret and apply NIFLA in the context of product disclosures, major uncertainties remain.

Go