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Category: California Consumer Privacy Act

CCPA Update: Key Proposed Regulations for Business Practices for Handling Consumer Requests

As we recently reported on this blog, the California Attorney General (AG) released long-awaited draft regulations to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). This is the second installment in a series of posts discussing the regulations most relevant to companies as they determine whether they are covered under the law and how to comply. This post discusses business practices for receiving and verifying consumer requests to delete or opt-out, and for disclosure of specific information, referred to in the regulations as “requests to know.”

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CCPA Update: California Attorney General Releases Proposed Regulations

On October 11, 2019, the California Attorney General released its long-anticipated Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Action and the text of its proposed regulations for the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), along with an Initial Statement of Reasons for the proposed regulations.  The documents are not a short read, with the proposed regulations covering 24 pages, the Notice 16 pages, and the Statement of Reasons another 47 pages. 

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Amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act: Six Clarifications

As readers of the Data Security Blog will know, the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) becomes operative on January 1, 2020.  The CCPA is the most sweeping consumer privacy law in the United States, covering most for-profit businesses that do business in California and collect the personal information of “consumers,” meaning California residents. 

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A Closer Look at the CCPA’s Private Right of Action and Statutory Damages

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) has significantly altered the potential consequences of a data breach under California law by permitting California consumers to bring civil suits for statutory damages, Cal. Civ. Code § 1798.150(a)(1), and to seek statutory damages of between $100 and $750 “per consumer per incident or actual damages, whichever is greater.” Id. § 1798.150(a)(1)(A). The ability to seek statutory damages is in addition to injunctive or declaratory relief. Id. § 1798.150(a)(1)(B),(C).

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Part III: Our Last Look at the CCPA’s Definition of “Personal Information”

In our third and final installment on the California Consumer Privacy Act’s (CCPA) expansive definition of “personal information,” we look at other sections of the CCPA that either limit the applicability of the law’s “personal information” definition or exclude information from coverage under the law.

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Part II: A Closer Look at the CCPA’s Definition of “Personal Information”

Our three-part series on the California Consumer Privacy Act’s (CCPA) expansive definition of “personal information” is designed to help businesses identify whether they hold information covered under the law, while also highlighting the potential pitfalls in the definition as we await interpretative regulations from the California Attorney General and potential amendments from the state’s legislature. In Part I, we explored the breadth of the definition. We now turn to the law’s two explicit exclusions from the definition of “personal information.” 

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A Closer Look at California’s New Privacy Regime: Two Critical Definitions

Businesses covered by the recently enacted California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) are scrambling to comply with the statute, which becomes “operative” on January 1, 2020, unless that date is changed by the California legislature. As we have noted in earlier blog posts, the CCPA is the most sweeping privacy law in the U.S. and has significant implications for any business that falls within its coverage.

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State Attorney General Starts Rulemaking Process for California Consumer Privacy Act

Yesterday, by e-mail and on its website, the California Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it would hold “six statewide forums to collect feedback” in advance of the rulemaking process for the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  The announcement did not include proposed rules or regulations, which must be adopted by July 1, 2020.

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California Legislature Makes Last-Minute Changes to New Data Privacy Law

As California’s legislative session came to a close late last month, the state’s lawmakers passed SB-1121, approving a series of tweaks to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 or CCPA, the far-ranging data privacy law enacted earlier this summer. The new bill now heads to the governor for consideration.

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What New York Businesses Need to Know About California’s New Data Privacy Law

As the home of Facebook and other tech giants, California recently found itself in the center of a data privacy firestorm. In response to this and other controversies emanating from Silicon Valley’s technology community, California enacted a far-ranging data privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018. Despite its California origins, however, the law could have significant effects on New York-based businesses as well.

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California’s New Privacy Law: A Closer Look

California’s landmark digital privacy law – signed into law late last week – is the most sweeping consumer data protection law in the U.S. The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 or CCPA promises to give consumers unprecedented control over their personal information including the right to know what information companies are collecting about them and how it is used.

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California Enacts Sweeping Consumer Privacy Law

California threw down the proverbial gauntlet last night and enacted a sweeping new digital privacy law aimed at giving the state’s consumers more control over their personal information.

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