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Category: Damages

Interlocutory Appeal in “Flushable Wipes” Cases Goes Down The Drain

Last month, the Second Circuit heard oral argument in what had seemed like the most consequential consumer class-action appeal in that court in years: three consolidated cases involving “flushable” hygienic wipes.  Both sides of the class-action bar were at the edge of their seat waiting for the Second Circuit’s guidance on several controversial issues of class-action law, including the appropriate standard for reviewing damages models at the class-certification stage.  Earlier this week, however, the Second Circuit essentially punted, sending the cases back to the district court for “further factual development.”  This is a frustrating result, but reading between the lines, class-action defendants may have reasons for cautious optimism.

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Extreme Pro-Plaintiff Changes Proposed To New York’s Consumer-Protection Law

It’s hard to argue that New York’s consumer-protection laws (Gen. Bus. Law §§ 349350) are being underutilized by private plaintiffs.  But, on that claimed basis, the state’s Legislature is considering a multifaceted amendment that would make those laws vastly more plaintiff-friendly—and business-unfriendly—than they already are.  It’s hard to understate the impact these changes would have on the business community.  We’re not sure what the bill’s odds of passage are, but given the extremity of the amendments, we’re a bit surprised they haven’t attracted more public attention.

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Lanham Act Dispute Brewing over Corn Syrup in Beer

While the New England Patriots were besting the Rams in the 2019 Super Bowl, Anheuser-Busch tried to get the upper hand on MillerCoors in a series of ads highlighting the “use of” corn syrup in Miller Lite and Coors Light. 

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Proving Retail Sales Figures In Consumer Class Actions: Different Approaches Lead To Very Different Results

To prove damages in a consumer class action, the named plaintiff must show—among other things—how many units of the defendant’s product were purchased by consumers in the relevant state (or states).  This is easier said than done.  Manufacturers generally keep records of their own wholesale transactions—i.e., how much product they shipped to distributors or large retail chains.  But they generally don’t have direct visibility into sales at the retail level, since they aren’t a party to those transactions.  If not all of the product sold at wholesale ends up being purchased by consumers, manufacturers’ records may not reflect this.  Likewise, if the product that a manufacturer ships to an address in State A (e.g., a regional distribution center) ends up being moved to State B before reaching store shelves, manufacturers’ records will not reflect this either.  What, then, is a class-action plaintiff to do?

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Court Certifies Class Action Over Gerber “Good Start Gentle” Baby Formula, Citing Consumers’ General Exposure to Ad Campaign

A recent decision from the Eastern District of New York, Hoth v. Gerber Prods. Co., 15-cv-2995 (E.D.N.Y.), granted class certification to purchasers of Gerber baby formula in Florida and New York who claimed to have been misled by representations that the formula reduced infants’ risk of developing allergies. The certified class is unusual, however, in that not all of its members actually purchased the product labeled with the alleged misrepresentation. Many courts have concluded that this lack of uniform exposure defeats certification by precluding a showing of classwide injury, but the Hoth court credited evidence that the general “advertising and labeling practice [regarding allergy prevention] allowed a price premium to be charged across the entire line of [challenged] products.” Op. at 41 (emphasis in original).

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Class Damages Models After Comcast: Rigorous Proof or Expert’s Promise?

In Comcast v. Behrend, 569 U.S. 27 (2013), the Supreme Court held that a plaintiff cannot obtain class certification with an inadequate damages model.  In the years since, courts have diverged over how much a plaintiff must do to satisfy this requirement.  Often, plaintiffs seek class certification with nothing more than a skeletal proposal to develop and perform an analysis at some future point, using information they do not—and might never—possess.  While some courts have found such adumbrative “models” sufficient at the class certification stage, the better decisions require more.  As Comcast recognizes, Rule 23 “does not set forth a mere pleading standard.”  Rather, a plaintiff “must affirmatively demonstrate” through “evidentiary proof” that damages are measurable on a class-wide basis through a common methodology.  Faithful application of that principle obligates plaintiffs and their experts to offer a detailed methodology that is tailored to the facts of the case, and to show that any data that the model requires in fact exists and can be obtained.

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Conjoint Analysis: No Silver Bullet for Calculating Class-Wide Damages

Over the last few years, “conjoint analysis” has become the methodology du jour for false advertising plaintiffs seeking to demonstrate they can calculate class-wide damages.  Conjoint analysis is so named because it is used to study the joint effects of multiple product attributes on consumers’ choices.  At bottom, conjoint analysis uses survey data to measure the strength of consumers’ preferences for particular product features.  Or, put differently, it tries to isolate how much people care about an individual product attribute in a multi-feature product (in a more scientific manner than just asking them directly).

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When You’re A False Advertiser, But It’s Someone Else’s Fault

Contribution and Indemnity Under The Lanham Act

Many statutes, including the Lanham Act, impose strict liability for false advertising.  Business may therefore incur liability even if a third party was partially or wholly at fault for the challenged inaccuracy.  For example, a cosmetics company that advertises its products as “all natural” may be held liable to a competitor through no fault of its own if an unscrupulous supplier substitutes synthetic pigments for the more expensive natural pigments that the company ordered and paid for.  Similarly, a food company that labels a product as containing “50 grams of protein per serving” may incur liability to consumers if the laboratory it retained to assay its products’ nutritional content botched those tests.

In the olden days, the law was content to leave whichever tortfeasor the plaintiff chose to sue on the hook for the whole tab—even if the chosen defendant was not the truly blameworthy party.  However, “[i]t is now widely recognized that fundamental fairness demands a sharing of the liability” in these situations.

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