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Category: Defenses

In Butter-Flavored Spray Case, Federal Labeling Preemption Sticks In the End

Federal food-labeling laws preempt state laws that impose requirements different from or in addition to those established by federal law.  In some cases, the FDA has spoken directly to a labeling issue by regulation, and if the food manufacturer is in compliance with that regulation, any state-law liability should be preempted.  Careful plaintiffs often try to draft their allegations to get around a federal regulation that would otherwise preempt their claims.  For instance, in challenging a defendant’s representations concerning honey in a cereal, a plaintiff avoided the defendant’s compliance with the federal labeling regulation on “flavoring” by alleging she was deceived about the relative amount of honey as a sweetener (which is not covered by a specific FDA regulation), rather than the relative amount of honey as a flavoring agent (which is covered).  When courts allow creative pleading to circumvent a preemption defense, defendants are deprived of the protections that Congress intended to provide them under federal labeling law, at least at the outset of the case.  But as a recent decision shows, defendants may be able to renew and succeed on a preemption defense after discovery shows plaintiff’s artful allegations were just that.

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When Two Wrongs Make a Right: Ninth Circuit Holds Proof of Injury Not Required for Unclean Hands

Our parents and teachers taught us that “two wrongs don’t make a right.”  But in the world of Lanham Act litigation, the opposite is often true.  When defending a Lanham Act claim brought by a competitor, the doctrine of unclean hands—the lawyerly version of “But they did it too!”—can be a case-dispositive argument.  Last month, the Ninth Circuit made it a bit easier to establish this defense, holding that a defendant arguing unclean hands need not prove that the plaintiff’s unclean conduct caused “actual harm.” See Certified Nutraceuticals, Inc. v. Avicenna Nutraceutical, LLC, 2020 U.S. App. LEXIS 22351 (9th Cir. July 27, 2020). 

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