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Category: Ethical Souring Claims

New Decision on “Free Range” Hens Has Manufacturers Walking On Eggshells

We’ve written before about the growing trend of “ethical sourcing” or “ethical production” class actions, which challenge manufacturers’ claims (or nondisclosures) about the humane (or inhumane) way their ingredients or materials are grown, caught, or harvested.  A recent decision out of the Southern District of New York in a case involving “free range” eggs typifies this litigation trend and the danger it poses to food and beverage manufacturers.

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Canada Goose Ruffles Feathers With Claims of Fur Sourcing

Courts are experiencing a recent surge of consumer class action filings alleging that manufacturers are misrepresenting the manner of procurement of materials for their products.  These allegations center around claims of “ethical sourcing.”  Broadly speaking, the goal of ethical sourcing is to ensure that a company only buys products and materials that are produced under reasonable working conditions and with fair pay for workers, as well as with minimal impact on the environment.  Ethical sourcing is intended to reinforce social and environmental responsibility by companies.

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First Circuit Rejects Boundless Consumer-Protection Liability for “Pure Omissions”

Increasingly, consumers base their purchase decisions on facts about a company or its product that have nothing to do with the performance or quality of the product itself.  For example, does the manufacturer treat its workforce fairly?  Is it a responsible steward of the environment?  What are its stances on social issues like abortion or LGBTQ rights?  To which parties or candidates does it (or its officers) donate?  All of these facts—and countless others—are “material” to many consumers in the sense that they affect (or even dictate) purchase decisions.  Indeed, in recent years, ethical, moral, and political concerns like these have led to countless instances of boycotts and other forms of consumer speech—a welcome sign of a healthy body politic and liberal democracy.

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Latest Scoop on the “Happy Cows” Lawsuit: Court Dismisses False Advertising Claims Against Ben & Jerry’s

Patrons of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream should be familiar with Woody, the bovine mascot touted by the company as “the most interesting cow in the world.”    Ben & Jerry’s packaging has long featured cartoon illustrations of Woody grazing beneath blue skies in bucolic green pastures.  This past year, however, Woody ambled into the sights of the plaintiffs’ class action bar.  Thankfully, she (and Ben & Jerry’s) emerged unscathed:  the district court (D. Vt.) dismissed the case at the pleadings stage, affirming both the authority of district courts to dismiss implausible consumer protection claims and the requirement that plaintiffs seeking injunctive relief demonstrate a probability of future injury.

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