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Category: Slack Fill

Speak of the Devil… Class Certified in “Slack-Fill” Case for the First Time

Speak of the Devil and he doth appear. Today, it’s just a figure of speech.  In medieval England, by contrast, people meant it literally—as a warning that uttering the Prince of Darkness’s name would conjure his evil presence.  Maybe those Anglo-Saxons had a point.  A few weeks ago, we wrote a post about a remarkable string of defense victories in “slack-fill” cases—i.e., lawsuits complaining of too much empty space in product packaging.  In particular, we noted that “every slack-fill case to reach the class-certification stage ha[d] flunked Rule 23’s rigorous test for certification,” and we wondered aloud “how a slack-fill class could ever be certified.”  Well, speak of the Devil: just four days later, a California court certified a class in a slack-fill case for the first time ever.  We apologize for any causal role we may have had in this truly diabolical development.  The good news is that the decision may not stick—and even if it does, it’s likely to remain an outlier.

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“Slack-Fill” Cases Coming Up Empty

Unless you were born yesterday, you know that packaged goods usually contain some empty space in the box, bottle, or bag.  This has been true for as long as there have been packaged goods.  What is relatively new is that consumers—or, rather, a small cadre of specialized plaintiff’s lawyers—are suing over it.  But as Newton said, for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.  And the more that lawyers have inundated courts with these suits, the more aggressively courts have responded to shut the silliness down. This post examines the regulatory underpinnings of these so-called “slack-fill” suits and the many bases that courts have found for letting the air out of them.

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