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Category: Slack Fill

Ninth Circuit: Plaintiff’s Lawyer Can’t “Mint” Money Over Voluntary Label Changes

Earlier this month, in a consumer action challenging alleged slack-fill in boxes of Junior Mints and Sugar Babies, the Ninth Circuit considered the reach of the “catalyst theory” for recovering attorney’s fees under California law. See Gordon v. Tootsie Roll Industries, Inc., No. 18-56315, 2020 WL 1846920 (9th Cir. Apr. 13, 2020). Under this theory—which the U.S. Supreme Court has rejected for federal claims—a litigant may be considered a “successful party” entitled to seek a fee award upon a showing that the litigation impelled the defendant to take corrective action.  Unfortunately for the plaintiff, the panel held that she was not a “successful party” under California law—even though the defendant had changed its marketing practices after the lawsuit was filed—because she had insisted that those changes would not resolve her gripes.

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Seventh Circuit Lets The Air Out Of Another “Slack Fill” Claim

This blog has previously examined the recent spate of so-called “slack-fill” lawsuits, in which consumers claim that a food (or other) product is misleadingly packaged because it contains excess air.  We noted that the growing trend is for courts to reject such suits at the motion-to-dismiss stage, for a variety of reasons.  For example, courts have found slack-fill complaints deficient for failing to allege, beyond conclusory platitudes, that the package’s empty space serves no legitimate function, or for failing to allege with plausibility that a reasonable consumer would actually be deceived.  Late last year, in Benson v. Fannie May Confections Brands, Inc., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit issued an important decision affirming the pleadings-stage dismissal of a slack-fill suit, but based on a distinct justification: the failure to plausibly allege any cognizable damages associated with slack-filled packaging.

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Misbranded Editors Present Webinar On “Hot Topics in Consumer False Advertising Litigation”

Last month, Misbranded co-editors Josh Kipnees, Jonah Knobler, and Jane Metcalf presented a live-streamed webinar via Bloomberg Law titled “Hot Topics in Consumer False Advertising Litigation.”  The free hour-long webinar, now available on demand, covers the following subjects, some of which should be familiar to regular readers of this blog:

  • “Natural” / “no artificial ingredients” claims

  • “No preservatives” claims

  • Ingredient claims (“made with [X]”)

  • Geographic origin claims (e.g., “Made in the USA”)

  • Slack-fill claims

  • Claims involving nondisclosure of morally troubling/offensive facts

  • What’s next in consumer false advertising litigation?

We encourage you to check it out (and obtain some CLE credit in the process).

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Speak of the Devil… Class Certified in “Slack-Fill” Case for the First Time

Speak of the Devil and he doth appear. Today, it’s just a figure of speech.  In medieval England, by contrast, people meant it literally—as a warning that uttering the Prince of Darkness’s name would conjure his evil presence.  Maybe those Anglo-Saxons had a point.  A few weeks ago, we wrote a post about a remarkable string of defense victories in “slack-fill” cases—i.e., lawsuits complaining of too much empty space in product packaging.  In particular, we noted that “every slack-fill case to reach the class-certification stage ha[d] flunked Rule 23’s rigorous test for certification,” and we wondered aloud “how a slack-fill class could ever be certified.”  Well, speak of the Devil: just four days later, a California court certified a class in a slack-fill case for the first time ever.  We apologize for any causal role we may have had in this truly diabolical development.  The good news is that the decision may not stick—and even if it does, it’s likely to remain an outlier.

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“Slack-Fill” Cases Coming Up Empty

Unless you were born yesterday, you know that packaged goods usually contain some empty space in the box, bottle, or bag.  This has been true for as long as there have been packaged goods.  What is relatively new is that consumers—or, rather, a small cadre of specialized plaintiff’s lawyers—are suing over it.  But as Newton said, for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.  And the more that lawyers have inundated courts with these suits, the more aggressively courts have responded to shut the silliness down. This post examines the regulatory underpinnings of these so-called “slack-fill” suits and the many bases that courts have found for letting the air out of them.

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