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Industry: Dietary Supplements

Misbranded Editors Present Webinar On “Hot Topics in Consumer False Advertising Litigation”

Last month, Misbranded co-editors Josh Kipnees, Jonah Knobler, and Jane Metcalf presented a live-streamed webinar via Bloomberg Law titled “Hot Topics in Consumer False Advertising Litigation.”  The free hour-long webinar, now available on demand, covers the following subjects, some of which should be familiar to regular readers of this blog:

  • “Natural” / “no artificial ingredients” claims

  • “No preservatives” claims

  • Ingredient claims (“made with [X]”)

  • Geographic origin claims (e.g., “Made in the USA”)

  • Slack-fill claims

  • Claims involving nondisclosure of morally troubling/offensive facts

  • What’s next in consumer false advertising litigation?

We encourage you to check it out (and obtain some CLE credit in the process).

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Court Finds No “Support” for Certification of Full-Refund Class Involving Biotin Supplement

A frequent target of consumer class actions are “structure/function” claims made in connection with dietary supplements.  These claims describe a nutrient or dietary ingredient and its role in the body’s structure or function: for example, “glucosamine promotes healthy joints.”  Plaintiffs may allege that a product’s labeling is misleading because the typical consumer already receives enough of the nutrient or ingredient from her diet.  At the same time, those plaintiffs will seek a refund on behalf of everyone who bought the product—even if many in the class have received a benefit.  A recent decision out of the Southern District of California, Alvarez v. NBTY, Inc., 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 87420 (May 22, 2019), suggests that this disconnect between the proposed class and the plaintiffs’ theory of liability and damages may no longer be tolerated at the class-certification stage.

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“Lack of Substantiation” Claims: A Substantively Lacking Liability Theory

As astronomer Carl Sagan famously said, “absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.”  Plaintiffs have not gotten the message.  They often allege that a defendant’s marketing or labeling statements are false and misleading on the sole basis that there is purportedly no evidence (or insufficient evidence) proving their truth.  These so-called “lack of substantiation” claims are easy to plead because a plaintiff does not need to conduct an investigation to identify evidence that the challenged statement is false.  Rather, she alleges only an absence of supporting evidence for the statement—and generally, in a conclusory manner.

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Compelled Product Disclosures After NIFLA – First Impressions

This is an exciting time for manufacturers on guard against compelled disclosures in their product labeling or advertising.  Late last June, the Supreme Court decided  National Institute of Family & Life Advocates v. Becerra, 138 S. Ct. 2361 (2018) (“NIFLA”), an abortion case with potentially far-reaching effects on the law of compelled commercial speech more generally.  However, as lower courts begin to interpret and apply NIFLA in the context of product disclosures, major uncertainties remain.

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