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Industry: Pharmaceuticals

“Lack of Substantiation” Claims: A Substantively Lacking Liability Theory

As astronomer Carl Sagan famously said, “absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.”  Plaintiffs have not gotten the message.  They often allege that a defendant’s marketing or labeling statements are false and misleading on the sole basis that there is purportedly no evidence (or insufficient evidence) proving their truth.  These so-called “lack of substantiation” claims are easy to plead because a plaintiff does not need to conduct an investigation to identify evidence that the challenged statement is false.  Rather, she alleges only an absence of supporting evidence for the statement—and generally, in a conclusory manner.

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“Slack-Fill” Cases Coming Up Empty

Unless you were born yesterday, you know that packaged goods usually contain some empty space in the box, bottle, or bag.  This has been true for as long as there have been packaged goods.  What is relatively new is that consumers—or, rather, a small cadre of specialized plaintiff’s lawyers—are suing over it.  But as Newton said, for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.  And the more that lawyers have inundated courts with these suits, the more aggressively courts have responded to shut the silliness down. This post examines the regulatory underpinnings of these so-called “slack-fill” suits and the many bases that courts have found for letting the air out of them.

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